Essential Contact Care Tips

Bad Habits Aging Your Eyes

7 BAD HABITS THAT ARE AGING YOUR EYESBad Habits Aging Your Eyes

  • Rubbing Your Eyes

The skin around your eyes is one of the first areas on your face to show signs of aging. Rubbing your eyes can break tiny blood vessels under the skin’s surface and cause dark circles and puffy eyes, as well as premature crow’s feet and drooping eyelids. Botox injections and cosmetic eyelid surgery can rejuvenate the eye area, but prevention is best: refrain from pulling and tugging at the skin around your eyes.

  • Forgetting Your Sunglasses

Exposing your eyes to the sun’s harmful UV and high-energy visible (HEV) rays is a surefire way to prematurely age and damage your eyes and eyelids. Extended sun exposure leads to: sunburn of the front surface of the eye (photokeratitis); cataracts; macular degeneration; pinguecula and pterygium (unsightly growths on the eye); and even cancer of the eyelid. Wear sunglasses that block 100 percent of UV rays and the most damaging HEV rays — even on overcast days!

  • Smoking

Smoking harms just about every organ in your body — including your eyes. Research has linked cigarette smoking to sight-threatening eye diseases such as cataracts, macular degeneration, uveitis, dry eyes and diabetic retinopathy. In fact, smokers are up to four times more likely to go blind, compared with non-smokers. The good news is that quitting smoking, no matter what your age, can reduce your risk of developing a serious eye condition.

  • Eating Poorly

Eating too much fast food and not enough fruits and vegetables? Then you’re probably not getting the necessary vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids for optimum eye health. Leafy greens, colorful fruit and vegetables, and wild-caught fish such as salmon can help prevent or manage many age-related eye diseases. Eye vitamins can fill in nutritional gaps, but a healthful diet, daily exercise and watching your waistline are more effective ways to keep your eyes in top shape.

  • Not Getting Enough Quality Shut-Eye

It’s called beauty sleep for a reason: not enough sleep can accelerate aging, and your eyes may be the first to suffer! Lack of sleep causes red, bloodshot eyes, dark circles under the eyes, eye twitching, dry eyes and blurry vision.

  • Not Drinking Enough Water

Not getting the recommended eight glasses of water a day and eating a high-sodium diet can cause your body to dehydrate and in turn not produce enough tears to keep your eyes moist and properly nourished. Eye-related symptoms of dehydration include dryness, redness and puffy eyelids.

  • Not Seeing Your Eye Doctor

Regular eye exams can detect vision problems, eye diseases and general health problems before you’re aware problems exist. Sight-threatening diseases such as glaucoma often have no warning signs until there is a permanent, irreversible loss of vision. Inform your eye doctor of your family’s eye health history to help determine if you have a high risk for a particular eye disease or condition.

Call Good Looks Eyewear today to schedule an eye exam.

Cranberry Locations:

Scott and Christie Eyecare Associates

105 Brandt Drive, Suite 201

Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

724-772-5420

Good Looks Eyewear

20215 U.S. 19

Cranberry Twp., PA 16066

7214-772-9090

Pittsburgh Location:

Good Looks Eyewear

1101 Freeport Road

Pittsburgh, PA 15238

412-782-0400

Maintaining Good Ocular Health

What Is Ocular Health?

Ocular health is, simply, the health of our eyes. Our eyes capture light and then work with our brains to help us see. Good ocular health is defined as having vision that is 20/20 or better with or without correction, and disease free eyes.

What Threatens Ocular Health?

Unfortunately, our eyes are constantly being exposed to things that can harm our vision. Whether it is UV from the sun or blue light from our extensive use of digital devices, we are constantly jeopardizing our ocular health. Blue light especially is a huge concern, as we spend a lot of time looking at our phones, computers, televisions, and tablets. This can cause digital eye strain and hurt our retinas. We can also strain our eyes by reading in bad lighting.

What Can You Do To Maintain Ocular Health?

It is very important to get your eyes checked frequently! Whether you are an adult or a child, regular check-ups are vital to maintaining good ocular health. Eye exams catch eye diseases early on so that they can be treated and controlled. They also look for refractive errors, which affect your vision by causing nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatisms. These sorts of issues can be corrected by prescription lenses, contacts, or in some cases, surgery. Along those lines, eye exams help you make sure that your prescriptions are up to date and correcting your vision, instead of harming you with the wrong ones! We can protect our eyes from UV by wearing good sunglasses and we can filter out the blue light with special blue light blocking lenses.

Why Is Getting Your Eyes Checked Now So Important?

It is important for people, especially students, to get their eyes checked at this time of year! If you are about to go back to school for the fall, you want to make sure your vision is where you thought it was, and that you have the right prescription. Many people think that they have 20/20 vision, but an eye exam reveals that they actually need some sort of prescription! Your current prescription could also be out of date, and you might need a new one to best correct your vision. Get your eyes checked to make sure you can catch any problems early on and get the right glasses, contacts, or surgery to correct your vision and maintain good ocular health!

The Danger of UV

Most of us have heard about how UV, which stands for ultraviolet radiation, is dangerous. It is invisible light, and only some of it is blocked by the ozone layer. It can cause sunburn and skin cancer. But UV isn’t just bad for your skin. It’s also harmful to your eyes. UV can be linked to plenty of eye problems, from eye strain and temporary vision loss (often called “Snow Blindness”) to cataracts. It can also cause macular degeneration, which is damage of the retina that can lead to permanent vision loss, through prolonged exposure to UV and blue light. As you head outside this summer (and during the rest of the year), it is important to be aware of the effects UV can have on your eyes, and to protect them.

We experience high risk of UV exposure in the great outdoors. Open spaces with sand, snow, or water are higher risk areas, as more UV is reflected off the light surfaces. You’ll find these conditions at the beach, ski slopes, or a lake. It is important to wear sunglasses when you are outside, especially in these settings. UV is also most intense around midday, when the sun is high in the sky. That doesn’t mean, however, that you don’t need to wear eye protection on cloudy days. Cloud cover does not block UV rays, and you are still at risk even when you can’t see the sun.

Because of the damaging effects of UV rays, and our high risk of exposure outside, it is important to purchase good sunglasses. When you choose sunglasses, keep UV in mind. Sunglass lenses have different levels of UV protection, and it’s important to choose a pair that is 100% UV blocking. It’s ideal to purchase a pair that have UV protection on both the front and back of the lenses, and styles that wrap around your face a bit protect your peripheral vision as well. Polarized lenses go a step further and block even more intense glare. Come by Good Looks Eyewear’s Cranberry or Pittsburgh locations to browse our selection of UV-blocking sunwear.

Dangers of Blue Light

Dangers of Blue LightWhat Is Blue Light?

Sunlight, or “white light” has a wide color spectrum. This visible light is made up of red, orange, yellow, green, and blue light. These types of light range in wavelength and energy. Blue light has the most energy of the visible lights, due to its shorter wavelengths. Blue light is very prevalent and makes up one third of the visible light around us.

The Problem:

Blue light, as I mentioned above, makes up one third of all visible light. The problem with this is that our eyes are pretty bad at blocking blue light! While our cornea and lens are good at blocking many other types of light, blue light goes right on through to the retina, which is at the very back of our eyes. Having the light reach the retina can cause degeneration of important cells, which can eventually lead to an eye disease called macular degeneration, and ultimately permanent vision loss.

To make matters worse we are being exposed to blue light in much more than nature. We constantly use technology like smartphones, computers, and tablets, which have blue light in their screens. We can get digital eye strain from looking at these displays for too long. Spending time staring at screens exposes our eyes to heavy doses of blue light, which as shown above is extremely harmful to our vision.

The Solution:

It is important to protect our eyes from the harmful effects of blue light. While it is ideal to avoid blue light by lessening our exposure through technology, it can be hard to go about our daily lives avoiding screens. Computer glasses, which are slightly tinted to block blue light, are a great option for those who need to spend time on their phones and computer but want to protect their eyes. They allow the wearer to spend time looking at screens without experiencing eye fatigue or discomfort, or at least diminishing the effects of blue light. If you spend a lot of time on your phone, computer, or tablet for business or school, lenses with blue light protection are the thing for you! Good Looks Eyewear offers computer glasses with digital blue light blocking lenses at our Pittsburgh and Cranberry locations.

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month

Currently, more than 3 million people in the United States have glaucoma, approximately 120,000 are blind from glaucoma, accounting for 9% to 12% of all cases of blindness. Glaucoma is called “the sneak thief of sight” since there are no symptoms and once vision is lost, it’s permanent. As much as 40% of vision can be lost without a person noticing. Those at higher risk include people of African, Asian, and Hispanic descent. Other high-risk groups include: people over 60, family members of those already diagnosed, diabetics, and people who are severely nearsighted. Regular eye exams are especially important for those at higher risk for glaucoma, and may help to prevent unnecessary vision loss. Talk to friends and family about glaucoma. If you have glaucoma, don’t keep it a secret. Let your family members know.

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month

 

Glaucoma patients, did you know that your eye pressure can be safely controlled without complex eye  drop regimens?  At Scott and Christie Eyecare Associates, we offer an alternative to eye drops and their side effects for glaucoma treatment: laser surgery that can greatly lessen or virtually eliminate your dependence on eye medications.  Covered by insurance plans, this FDA-approved laser procedure is fast, safe and effective. .  If you are interested in freeing yourself from the inconvenience of your current eye drop regimen and expensive monthly trips to the pharmacy, please contact Scott & Christie Eyecare Associates to see if laser surgery is right for you.